6yo Boy Kidnapped from School By Police, Locked in Psych Ward for 3 Days — for Temper Tantrum

0
41

“It felt like my child had been kidnapped,” she said. “I can’t even hug my kid and tell him it’s going to be okay.”

Jacksonville, FL — For throwing a temper tantrum, 6-year-old Nicholas, who has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, was kidnapped from his elementary school by police and imprisoned in a psychiatric hospital.

Nicholas was held, including multiple stints in a ‘seclusion room,’ for three days at River Point Behavioral Health.

According to Buzzfeed, “River Point Behavioral Health is a troubled unit of the nation’s largest psychiatric hospital chain, Universal Health Services. UHS was the subject of a recent BuzzFeed News investigation, which found that current and former employees from at least 10 of the company’s hospitals in nine states said they were under pressure to fill beds by almost any method and to hold patients until their insurance payments ran out. Nicholas was covered by Medicaid, the government insurance program.”

Once admitted to the hospital, the staff stayed true to their tendency of holding patients and did everything they could to use the state to force Nicholas to stay. This was in spite of his parents’ demands to let him out.

“I didn’t want him to be there at all,” Nicholas’ mom told BuzzFeed News, adding that she immediately asked the facility to release her son because he was so young and didn’t need to be there.

“It felt like my child had been kidnapped,” she said. “I can’t even hug my kid and tell him it’s going to be okay.”

At River Point, as reported by Buzzfeed, Nicholas would be given a bloody nose by another child, get locked in a “seclusion” room at 3 in the morning, and wait more than 24 hours to see a psychiatrist, according to medical records provided by his parents.

READ MORE:  In Florida, Non-Submission to a Police Beating is “Attempted Murder”

His parents asked at least three times to take their son home — every time, they were denied.

“The Baker Act is supposed to confine really mentally ill people who are dangerous — and a kid who has a temper tantrum is not a danger to the public,” said Stephen Talmadge, a lawyer and psychologist who specializes in that law and who reviewed documents from Nicholas’s case, according to Buzzfeed. ”What is the kid going to do, bite a stranger?”

When Nicholas’ parents finally got to see their son, he’d been put through so much torment and stress that he couldn’t make eye contact or even talk.

“He was out of his mind, we didn’t recognize him,” said his father. “It was hard to leave him there — you wanted to just grab him and run out of the facility with him.”

As Buzzfeed reports, this little boy, who the state deemed a threat to society was nothing of the sort. After he was finally released from the hospital, he went back to his kind and loving self.

On a recent warm December day at a playground in Jacksonville, Nicholas was dressed in a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles T-shirt and blue jeans, his skin bronzed from the Florida sun. He kissed his mother and ran off to play.

At one point, Nicholas bumped into a smaller boy on the swing set and looked startled when the boy fell down and began to cry. Nicholas ran and hid under the slide.

But then he emerged and approached the boy. They began taking turns tossing a ball at a hoop in the corner of the playground. Soon, they were laughing.

The 55lb, 4′ tall 6-year-old, as described above, is the same person police, school officials, state officials, and state-funded psychiatrists all felt was a threat to society.

READ MORE:  Facebook Will Now Warn You if Your Account is Targeted by Government

What this case illustrates is the dependency upon the state to resort to the use of police and force to solve problems previously solved by councilors and parents.

As the Free Thought Project previously reported, according to statistics released by the U.S. Department of Education and published by NBC News, in the 2011-2012 school year, teachers called the cops on students a total of 31,961 times in the state of California alone, leading to 6,341 arrests.

If a 6-year-old boy was taken by police from a school and locked in an isolation room in the 90’s, you can rest assured that this would not fly. Instead, it has become the go-to approach in the land of the free.

In May, we reported on the video showing a San Antonio Independent School District police officer body slam a 12-year-old girl. In February, the Free Thought Project brought you the story of the Baltimore School cop who was seen beating a student who had done nothing wrong.

In fact, recent videos have revealed a myriad of school cops attacking unarmed students. In December, Officer Rigo Valles was cleared of any wrongdoing after grabbing a student by the neck and slamming him to the floor. In October, Richland County Deputy Ben Fields was fired after students recorded him flipping over a girl’s desk and dragging her across the floor. Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Thomas Jaha was charged with assault and battery in October as well, after repeatedly punching a student in the face for not having a hall pass.

In November 2015, prosecutors agreed to dismiss assault charges against Louisville Metro Police Officer Jonathan Hardin for punching a student in the face if the former officer completes anger management classes. Hardin still faces wanton endangerment, official misconduct, and assault charges for choking another student unconscious in a separate incident five days later. In separate incidents earlier this year, school cops have also been caught attacking an autistic boy, body-slamming a child, and raping nearly two dozen students.

READ MORE:  Cop Caught Framing Citizen Journalist On Camera

And these are the ones the public knows about. How many more incidents, just like this one, go unreported and unpunished?

What this data illustrates is the societal dependence on the state to solve matters that should be handled without government. Being dependent upon the state to solve one’s problems is a de facto dependency upon violence.

“The State represents violence in a concentrated and organized form. The individual has a soul, but as the State is a soulless machine, it can never be weaned from violence to which it owes its very existence.” -Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

If you truly want a glimpse into the horrid effects of the police state on all school children, take a scroll through our archives, at this link.

Until people wake up to the reality of relying on a system of violence to maintain “order” and behavior compliance, we can expect this problem to get worse.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here